ARCHIVE

Big Thinkers

Isaac Newton

Isaac Newton

When his university is closed due to an outbreak of the plague, a young man retreats to his childhood home in Lincolnshire to consider the laws of gravity…

Louis Braille

Louis Braille

A former soldier visits a school for the blind in Paris to demonstrate his ‘night writing’ invention that, unfortunately, is too complicated for the soldiers to understand. But a 12 year old boy adapted his invention to create the system that today bears his name: Braille.

Pablo Picasso

Pablo Picasso

Pablo Picasso’s name is immediately recognisable and he is often used as a case study for creativity. Inspired to break away from his classical training by a group of radicals in a cafe in Barcelona, this 20th century artist went on to co-create Cubism.

Archimedes

They say people think most clearly while in the bathroom and the Archimedes Principle is a perfect example of this. Master of philosophy, mathematics, mechanics and physics, but how did he change history in the bath tub?

Albert Einstein

Silent until the age of 3 and only a mediocre student at school, this young man would become a universal symbol of genius, despite his humble beginnings. Einstein prized his ability to think creatively and imaginatively, and had a lot to say about how to be creative.

Coco Chanel

After fashioning a dress out of an old jersey on a cold winter’s day, a young lady was soon inundated with orders, paving the way to a career that would change the face of fashion. Her Chanel suit was the first of its kind and she was also the first person to bring out a perfume in her own name, Chanel No.5.

Trevor Baylis

While watching a programme on TV, this British inventor had an idea. Before the programme had finished, he’d created his first prototype. What was his groundbreaking invention?

Thomas Edison

Thomas Edison

Thomas Edison, icon of innovation, is best known for his development of a light bulb for the people and for patenting a record 1,093 inventions.

George de Mestral

George de Mestral

George de Mestral went for a walk in the woods with his dog. When he returned home, a short leap of imagination led him to the early designs for what we know today as Velcro.