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The serious business of laughter

Stanford’s Eric Tsytsylin believes we should be taking laughter seriously. He explains why laughter is a powerful tool for individuals and organisations to boost happiness, creativity and productivity.

Does Google’s 20% time work?

Google’s 20% time has gained a lot of attention over recent years. Employees can take up to one day a week to work on something unrelated to their work, something they are passionate about. But does it work?

In asking that question, we have split it in two: how does it work and does it actually work? The latter can be interpreted to mean does it work for the employee and does it work for Google?

As an employee incentive, Innovation Time Off (as it is formally known) can be taken by any member of staff. Some people save it up so it can all be used at once, some don’t take it at all. It has certainly caused a stir and marked Google out, yet again, as an innovative company that understands what clever people need to stay inspired at work. Apple and LinkedIn followed suit. Apple called theirs “Blue Sky” and lets employees take two weeks to work on projects outside their normal responsibilities. Software company Atlassian openly calls their programme ‘20% time’.

An open Valve for creativity in business

The Valve handbook for new employees explains the ‘flatland’ approach of having no hierarchy, no boss to impress of be scared to speak up in front of, no pattern of employing talented people and then just telling them what to do.

Can creative thinking thrive in the office?

Working from home has lost its revolutionary status. It used to be seen as progressive, something forward thinking companies did. It was predicted that emails and Skype meetings would become the main method of colleague communication and remote working would be the...